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Luke Phillips
Luke Phillips

Amble



"to move easily and gently without hard shocks," as a horse does when it first lifts the two legs on one side and then the two on the other, early 14c., from Old French ambler, in reference to a horse or other quadruped, "go at a steady, easy pace" (12c.), from Latin ambulare "to walk, to go about, take a walk," perhaps a compound of ambi- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") and -ulare, from a Proto-Italic *ala- "to wander," from PIE root *el- "to go" (source also of Greek ale "wandering," alaomai "wander about;" Latvian aluot "go around or astray"), as per de Vaan. Until 1590s used only of horses or persons on horseback. Related: Ambled; ambling.




amble



"an easy walking gait (of a horse), the gait of a horse when both legs on one side are in motion at the same time," late 14c., from Old French amble, from ambler "go at a steady, easy pace" (see amble (v.)). Of persons by c. 1600.


mid-14c., "passage in a house; open passage between buildings; walkway in a garden," from Old French alee (13c., Modern French allée) "a path, passage, way, corridor," also "a going," from fem. of ale, past participle of aler "to go," which is of uncertain origin. It might be a contraction of Latin ambulare "to walk" (Watkins, see amble (v.)), or it might be from Gallo-Roman allari, a back-formation from Latin allatus "having been brought to" [Barnhart]. Compare sense evolution of gate.


The name AMBLE + CHASE pays homage to the winemaking process. During the long growing season, the winemaker will "amble" through the vineyard, watching over the vines and ensuring the highest quality fruit, which is followed by the "chase" when the grapes are ready to be harvested. 041b061a72


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